Uranium resources exist around the globe, not just in the conventional mine deposits but also in ‘secondary sources’ such as nuclear warheads, military and commercial byproducts, and ‘uranium tails’, spent nuclear fuel that can be recycled and re-enriched to create more fuel. The leading producers of uranium are Canada, Kazakhstan and Australia, followed by Namibia and the United States also producing.

Nuclear power can offer an energy supply that is secure, with plenty of resources available; has predictable long-term costs; and can help to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. In 2009, there were 437 reactors in operation in 30 countries, and more countries are expressing an interest in initiating a nuclear energy supply programme. Currently, around 1 in 7 kWh of electricity globally is generated from nuclear power.

The USA has the largest installed capacity for generation, with over 100,000 MWe of nuclear power capacity currently in operation. France is close behind, with over 60,000 MWe of capacity available in 2009; but this counts for far more of France’s total electricity supply, a total of 75% of the market share. In comparison, the USA’s nuclear share is only 20% of their total electricity generation.

Global Uranium recoverable reserves

  Loading graph...

Uranium installed capacity by region

  Loading graph...

Top nuclear producing countries

  Loading graph...

Uranium installed capacity by region

  Loading graph...